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Kate Barke had to say goodbye to her children at the gate just 15 minutes before their Ryanair flight was due to take off for Palma de Mallorca due to new Brexit rules.
Ryanair’s boss Michael O’Leary has called for “a bit more” of common sense on the government’s side when implementing post-Brexit immigration rules.
Brexit is making it harder for airports and airlines to recruit staff, adding to shortages that are causing travel chaos, according to a leading recruiter.
He also criticised the UK government and what he called “the disaster” of Brexit, which had stopped airlines easily recruiting European workers, and thus worsened staff shortages this summer. “This is without doubt one of the inevitable consequences of the disaster that has been Brexit,” he said.
Boss of @Ryanair, O'Leary: "This gov't couldn't run a sweet shop. We are fully staffed. But we are hide-bound and hamstrung by a gov't so desperate to show Brexit has been a success, when it's been an abject failure, it won't allow us to bring in EU workers to do these jobs."
The ‘thousands of jobs’ affected by Brexit have added to travel chaos at UK airports, the boss of Ryanair has said.
EasyJet reportedly had to turn down thousands of job applications from EU citizens because of Brexit.
'This government couldn’t run a sweet shop', says Michael O’Leary,
Airlines and airports are facing the effects of staff shortages in vital areas such as baggage handling and security, just as the peak summer travel period approaches.
"Thirty per cent of the people who worked in UK aviation before the covid pandemic were EU nationals."
Ryanair announced that it has stopped trading on the LSE’s main market from 8am this morning, while maintaining a primary listing on Dublin’s Euronext.
Ryanair has confirmed plans to delist its shares from the London Stock Exchange in response to EU rules on ownership post-Brexit.
Ryanair Holdings Plc said it will drop its London Stock Exchange listing, becoming the first major company to blame its departure on Brexit.
Rule changes and high costs have been cited for the move, leaving the Irish airline listed solely on the Euronext Dublin exchange.
The Independent has repeatedly reminded airlines about the European rules. The UK government continues to misrepresent them, advising travellers “on the day you travel you [must] have at least six months left on your passport”.
Ryanair Holdings Plc is poised to drop its London Stock Exchange listing, becoming the first major company to blame its departure on Brexit.
Ryanair is planning to delist from the London Stock Exchange in coming months due to a fall in trading volumes there, executives said on Monday, dealing another blow to London's status as a global financial center after Brexit.
Ryanair is considering a potential delisting from the London stock exchange, following the UK’s ‘Brexit’ withdrawal from the European Union.
Ryanair Holdings Plc is forcing investors who aren’t European Union citizens to sell any shares purchased after Jan. 1, in a reminder of the lingering constraints on investors tied to the Brexit split.
Furious Brits were reportedly turned away from a Ryanair flight from Manchester and Spain as expats face confusion caused by Brexit and a Covid travel ban.
Michael O’Leary, chief executive of Ryanair, has once again attacked Brexit – comparing the UK’s decision to leave the EU to North Korea’s isolationism.
Airline says that UK investors will be barred from voting, speaking at or attending AGMs. British citizens and institutions will also no longer be able to buy shares in the company to ensure that it is majority owned and controlled by EU citizens.
Days before the UK is set to leave the European Union (EU), the boss of Ryanair has lambasted Theresa May’s government – and the Labour opposition.
The move will affect 500,000 passengers, with more than 300 jobs also expected to be lost at the airport. / Citing Brexit uncertainty and the subsequent threat to the Scottish economy - particularly within the aviation industry - the airline has advised it will cut 20 of its 23 routes out of the airport from November.
Ryanair may have to stop selling flights to and from the UK at the end of 2018 if Britain and the EU fail to agree a post-Brexit aviation deal, according to its chief executive, Michael O’Leary.