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The delay in extra checks on EU imports has been criticised by businesses for creating confusion and leaving UK borders vulnerable to unsafe produce.
With a lack of foreign labour in Britain’s fields, crops are rotting and thousands of healthy pigs are being culled unnecessarily.
British food prices are set to surge 15% this summer and will remain high for at least a year, in a further blow to hard-pressed consumers already struggling with the cost-of-living crisis, according to a report released on Thursday.
Pig farmers are warning of a crisis that threatens a mass exodus from an industry facing a skills shortage as well as huge increases in costs of feed and energy.
Extra trade barriers created by Britain's exit from the European Union and subsequent trade agreement have added 6% to the cost of food, researchers from the London School of Economics and other universities estimated on Wednesday.
A pig farmer who has been losing around £5,000 a week since Christmas has called for more government support for the industry.
Labour shortages caused by Brexit and accentuated by the COVID pandemic have badly affected businesses across the food and farming sector and could cause ‘permanent’ damage, UK lawmakers stated in a report published on Wednesday (6 April).
Crops left unharvested, healthy pigs culled and increased costs which will ultimately have to be swallowed by the consumer. Not going well, is it?
Labour shortages and price rises triggered by Brexit and the pandemic could leave the British food and farming industry permanently damaged, MPs have warned.
A lack of food and farm workers “caused by Brexit and accentuated by the pandemic” meant at least 35,000 pigs were culled and tonnes of crops left to rot in the fields last year, a damning report has revealed.
The Covid pandemic has exacerbated the problems caused by Britain leaving the EU, the report found.
‘Deeply misguided’ to ‘weaken this layer of protection for both animal and public health’, government told.
NFU president tells conference ministers have no understanding of how food production works. / Food producers have said the challenges they face are “the toughest in a generation” as members of the National Farmers’ Union met for their annual conference after the first full year of Brexit.
This “disaster should have and could have been avoided”, and that the situation pig farmers find themselves in “truly is an utter disgrace”.
An estimated 200,000 pigs are backed up on farms because of a lack of skilled butchers to process them, while 40,000 animals have already been culled and their meat thrown away, farmers said this morning.
Pig farmers are in a “desperate” position – with culls of thousands of healthy animals and producers quitting the industry, they warned as a summit was held on the crisis.
Talk at this week’s NFU conference will be alive with financial, labour and competition concerns.
Pig farmers are in a “desperate” position – with culls of thousands of healthy animals and producers quitting the industry, they warned as a summit was held on the crisis.
The National Pig Association is calling for urgent action ahead of an emergency summit with the Government.
Farmers have held a protest outside government offices in York over claims the pig industry is at risk of collapse.
Thousands of pig farmers say they are in ‘a living hell’ as a perfect storm of supply chain delays caused by COVID and a shortage of butchers has pushing their industry to the edge.
A furious Neil Parish laid into Kevin Foster, the immigration minister, for ignoring a recommendation to make it easier to bring in EU butchers and other workers – leading to a huge shortage.
Minister under fire for rejecting moves to bring in EU farm workers – as vegetable planting plunges 25%.
With the pandemic worsening supply chain problems and UK worker shortages caused by Brexit, there’s a chance we may need to adapt our Christmas dinners this year.
Every farmers' worst nightmare is coming to pass; the mass culling of healthy animals because there simply aren't enough butchers to process them and get them off farms... So how did we get here?