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However, this article seeks to describe, as far as possible, how Brexit has affected the business and regulatory environment across the full range of areas covered by Steptoe and Johnson practices so far, and to identify issues of potential future concern for companies.
However, simply because we can diverge does not mean that we should diverge; the benefits are negligible at best. The likely result would be the United Kingdom no longer being recognised as a “trusted partner” in the field of data security and the end of a free flow of data.
A Brexit agreement for data transfers between the UK and the EU was agreed last year – how might it affect the data analytics industry? By Liam Kay.
Recently, the government launched a wide-ranging consultation on proposed changes to the UK’s data landscape, with Brussels’ warnings that it will sever a data-sharing agreement with the UK if the proposed reforms are found to pose a threat to EU citizens’ privacy.
With an adequacy decision for the UK looming, Laura Irvine, a Partner at law firm Davidson Chalmers Stewart, shares her insights on how this will affect storing data in the cloud.
As the UK’s last European commissioner, I know how welcome it is that a deal was struck—and how much remains to be done
Britain has been told to prepare for a no-deal Brexit when the transition period ends on 1 January 2021, after trade deal talks reached an impasse.
'Trade campaigners have welcomed the release of leaked papers detailing trade talks between the Trump administration and British government officials, which show the US government pushing Britain into as hard a Brexit as possible because they see this as the best way of benefitting the US economy. This comes at the expense of standards, protections and livelihoods in Britain.'
With the NHS under such exceptional pressure during the coronavirus crisis, it’s easy to overlook the fact that the UK’s Brexit transition period ends on December 31. Mark Dayan takes a closer look at how these two challenges for the health service might collide, and says there is a case to err on the side of caution.
The Home Office is refusing to reveal how it will use data collected from EU citizens applying to remain in the UK after Brexit.
'What really got my alarm bells ringing is this sentence under the privacy policy heading: "We may also share your information with other public and private sector organisations in the UK and overseas."'