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Our report published today looks at six key areas of health and social care that are being impacted by Brexit.
The United Kingdom’s food system will be greatly impacted by Brexit-related trade deals and policy developments—with implications for dietary risk factors and public health. Here we use an integrated economic–health modelling framework to analyse the impacts of different policy approaches to Brexit.
Ask your MP to read the report and back our calls to #LiftTheDeadline.
In what follows, a group of leading social scientists explore these themes, explaining what has happened in the past, the situation the UK finds itself in now, and the issues that might confront us going forward. The collection is intended as a guide to the big questions confronting the country in the years to come.
A review of evidence about opportunities, challenges and risks to the North East economy and its key sectors with recommendations for action.
Brexit could have major implications for health and social care in England. Here we look at some of the latest developments that could have an impact.
The BMA has repeatedly warned that a 'no deal' Brexit will have damaging consequences for patients, the health workforce and health services across the UK and Europe. From the supply of medicines and patient access to care, to Northern Ireland and the impact on the health workforce: no part of the health service will be left unscathed.
The report shows that no deal will not “get Brexit done” rather, it will usher in a period of prolonged uncertainty for citizens, workers and businesses, which is unlikely to be resolved anytime soon, our new report, No deal Brexit: issues, impacts, implications, reveals.
Leaving the EU without a deal threatens health and the NHS in many ways, but the scale of the threat remains unclear. / We propose a framework that could be the basis for the comprehensive health impact assessment to inform politicians and the public. / The government’s claims that it is prepared for no deal are implausible and, at best, might mitigate some of the worst consequences.
As the EU referendum grows ever closer, Lord Darzi, Elias Mossialos and colleagues seek to redress a lack of evidence on the role of the union on our health system.
All forms of Brexit are bad for health, but some are worse than others. This paper builds on our 2017 analysis using the WHO health system building blocks framework to assess the likely effects of Brexit on the National Health Service (NHS) in the UK.