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Thanks to higher costs, increased red tape and supply chain damage, we must get used to living in a country with empty shelves.
Professor Chris Elliott talks through discussions had at Food Integrity Global and highlights improved food fraud detection, Brexit’s impact... / The Brexit elephant in the room was also discussed. While some in government say that it is not a big risk factor in terms of escalating food fraud risks the message was very loud and clear that it is.
Concerns grow that post-Brexit trade deals could lead to further decline in quality as battery farm eggs are reintroduced.
Worried farmers hit out at the government, telling NationalWorld it “has no interest in protecting the agricultural industry at all”.
Costs finally revealed, as Northern Ireland secretary claims too much ‘doom and gloom’ around Brexit. / New post-Brexit border checks set to come into force in 2024 will cost UK companies at least £330m a year, Rishi Sunak’s government has admitted.
The government has admitted it will cost businesses £330m each year in additional charges when new post-Brexit border controls on animal and plant products imported from the European Union are implemented next year.
It’s no secret that COVID-19 and Brexit have had a lasting effect on a wealth of businesses. In particular, the manufacturing sector has been heavily impacted due to the UK’s withdrawal from the single market and the subsequent restrictions on imports and exports.
Jo Foster has asked her MP, Rishi Sunak, three times for help with her businesses struggling after Brexit. She told Politics Editor Ralph Blackburn he needs to face up to reality.
From queues in Dover to rising food prices, Brexit has been blamed for a number of things impacting families. But it has given us Rishi Sunak's 'Brexit pub guarantee' - here we look at the good, the bad and the ugly consequences.
It appears HM Treasury has realised bringing in a measure that will so obviously lead to higher food prices is not a good idea when the country is in the grip of an inflation spiral.
There remains widespread anger amongst Scotland’s farmers and growers amid press reports that the UK Government is to further delay – for the fourth time – the introduction of post-Brexit border controls on animal and plant products imported from the EU.
Post-Brexit checks on fresh farm produce coming to the UK from the EU have been delayed again, the BBC understands. / New import controls on EU food products had been due to begin in October. There is concern that the extra checks on imported goods will push up prices and fuel inflation.
Further delays to introducing post-Brexit border controls on fresh farm produce from the EU 'seriously disregards' the interests of British farmers, NFU Scotland has warned.
Exit from the single market making it harder to import art, auction house warns.
The move has been dubbed "the most explicit acknowledgement by the UK government that Brexit trade barriers are inflationary."
Government source reportedly says there are concerns extra red tape could fuel further inflation.
From October, consignments carrying some meats, dairy and fish will require vet-signed export health certificates.
Many businesses are unprepared for the new rules which will come into effect from October 31.
Former European trade commissioner Peter Mandelson said trying to circumnavigate Brussels was always going to backfire.
The government’s new trade strategy, the Border Target Operating Model, will bring a new round of controls on goods from the EU from 31 October 2023.
Henderson Foodservice sought supplies from Mauritius as it was cheaper than Great Britain under post-Brexit rules, boss says.
British government is planning to introduce the controls at the end of October, with the move expected to cause delays and disruption.
Britain’s looming departure from the European Union has sparked a rush to bring goods into the country before Jan. 1, pushing up delivery prices and generating queues at borders.
The City has been plunged into something of an existential panic in recent months. Fears of international decline have crystallised in the form of a listings drought and a crack squad of City grandees are scrambling to try and steady the ship.
Proposed restrictions on post-Brexit trade will pile costs onto consumers, representatives of the UK’s fresh produce industry warned.