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Six years after the referendum on June 23, 2016, if we put aside the profound political consequences – a divided England, Scotland and Northern Ireland pulling away, a more isolated country – what is the economic toll?
As of December 2022, UK companies importing medicines from the EU may need to set up new batch testing facilities. What will this mean for the industry and how did the situation come about?
A MOTHBALLED border crossing building – which has never been used – will drain almost £2m from Portsmouth taxpayers while it blights the city’s port as an empty ‘white elephant’.
If Britain ends up in the recession expected by the Bank of England, public anger will be looking for an outlet. / I asked Albrecht Ritschl, professor of economic history at the LSE, what single move the UK government could make to alleviate the pain. “Suspend Brexit for 20 years.”
As small businesses crumble, shelves get emptier and the care-worker shortage intensifies, life outside the EU is having a dire effect on many of us. Why aren’t politicians talking about it?
'We are not the envy of the world anymore, we are the crackpot aunty in the corner that everyone laughs at.'
The import of apparel by the United Kingdom was badly hit by Brexit and the COVID-19 pandemic. The value of UK’s apparel import has been declining from 2019, when it became imminent that Brexit is going to take place.
Claim that UK farming at risk if ‘soft’ approach pursued with countries with ‘less qualms’ about quality.
A British wholesaler who supplies the UK retail market is moving his business to the South of France in order to mitigate Brexit redtape, which he says has cost his business £150,000.
Crippling import costs faced by an Inverness retailer were raised during an exchange at Westminster. / Inverness SNP MP Drew Hendry highlighted the costs faced by Oil and Vinegar importing goods from the EU during the exchange with UK Trade Minister Andrew Griffith.
Daniel Lambert, who supplies M&S, Waitrose and 300 independent retailers, to set up in France after £150,000 hole in revenue.
Ports are seeking compensation for the facilities, which were meant to carry out the government's new post-Brexit checks but have been put on hold until the end of next year. / Ports across the country are threatening the government with legal action unless compensation is paid to cover the millions of pounds they've spent building new border control posts.
The delay in extra checks on EU imports has been criticised by businesses for creating confusion and leaving UK borders vulnerable to unsafe produce.
Boris Johnson’s government faces deep economic problems. / UK lagging behind major peers on productivity and investment. / “... From a 16% devaluation of the pound to an eye-watering slide in trade and investment, Brexit’s impact is plain to see. The data have only reinforced our view that life outside of the EU would leave the UK worse off.”
Yes, that headline is correct. The UK’s trade performance this year fell to its worst level since records began in 1955. And the cause, according to analysts and a headline article in the FT today – Brexit.
Rural voters say they’re being neglected by the government – and farmers are disgruntled too, warning that rising costs could lead to food shortages… and that post-Brexit trade deals will see them losing out to cheap imports.
Official figures corroborate academic studies showing sharp drop in exports since Brexit.
Government condemned for trying ‘to rush it through’ – in echoes of Northern Ireland Protocol now being torn up. / MPs should block the Australia trade deal because the government has broken a promise to allow it to be scrutinised properly, a damning report says.
The government’s failure to impose full import controls on food coming from the EU since Brexit has exposed the UK to increased risk of sub-standard products reaching the shelves, a new report has warned.
The Food Standards Agency (FSA) and Food Standards Scotland (FSS) released the first of what will now be an annual report.
Immediately after the referendum, sterling depreciated. This brought forward the impact on household incomes of what would otherwise be a slow burn change for the UK economy.
Brexit has reduced the competitiveness of the British economy, with alarming implications for productivity and wages, according to the Resolution Foundation.
Real pay set to be £470 lower per worker each year, say top economists. / “We can’t blame Brexit for all of the 5.2 per cent GDP shortfall … but it’s apparent that Brexit is largely to blame,” said John Springford, author of the CEF study.
EU withdrawal fuelling higher import costs and costing British workers nearly £500 a year, says Resolution Foundation.
What should we call a project that poleaxes the economy, destroys our global reputation and threatens political stability in Northern Ireland? If we had known what would come to pass, how would we have voted on it six years ago?