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Brexit has been “a horrendous experience for Maltese businesses,” according to the CEO of the Malta Chamber of SMEs.
The chair of the British Chambers of Commerce, Shevaun Haviland, says British exporters have faced "huge issues" trying to sell their goods abroad since Brexit.
British Chambers of Commerce presents government with urgent recommendations as members report struggling to sell into EU.
Extra paperwork, border checks and additional costs for exports - Brexit has destroyed the livelihoods of countless musicians.
ACTIVISTS in Edinburgh have kicked off the third anniversary Brexit events with action outside the UK Government Hub.
Cost of labour in Britain up by 30% since referendum, double rise in some EU countries, research finds.
Cycloc says ‘Kafkaesque’ rules have cost it £100,000 in latest tale of how EU exit is harming small firms.
Government accused of ‘failure and broken promises’, as exports set to slump next year.
Almost four years after Johnson promised the fishing merchant the French would be desperate to buy his fish, the business has seen sales plummet 30% and export costs rise by as much as £3,000 a week.
The reformulated treats no longer require an export health certificate or veterinary inspection now that they contain vegetable oils in lieu of butter.
A SCOTTISH farmers union has criticised the UK Government for kicking “the can down the road” on implementing an improved system of border controls for meat and other products entering the country.
Although the pound is losing value, exports are lagging. Bureaucratic hurdles also paralyze trade. Brexit is a catastrophe in other respects too.
Obwohl das Pfund an Wert verliert, hinkt der Export. Bürokratische Hürden lähmen den Handel zusätzlich. Auch sonst ist der Brexit eine Katastrophe.
A UK exporter of brownies and cakes has seen Brexit-related costs drop “significantly” after replacing animal-derived ingredients with vegan alternatives.
From confused carriers to mind-boggling bureaucracy, Lucy Reece Raybould, CEO of British Footwear Association (BFA), tells Drapers how Brexit is still impacting trade for UK businesses.
New research conducted by the British Chambers of Commerce has found that British businesses are being hampered in their trade with the EU because of the current Brexit deal but it finds that some changes and a few "side deals" could solve some key problems.
Businesses have cited Brexit after the UK recorded its worst month in over two and a half years.
MacDuff 1890 were supplying customers on the continent with 'Rolls Royce of Scottish Beef'.
Public opinion shifted against Brexit after a deluge of damning evidence on economic costs.
Mr Foord criticised the current trading arrangements and called for a smoother process with less paperwork.
In reality, Brexit has hobbled the UK economy, which remains the only member of the G7 — the group of advanced economies that also includes Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan and the United States — with an economy smaller than it was before the pandemic.
"The UK chose Brexit in a referendum, but the government then chose a particularly hard form of Brexit, which maximized the economic cost."
Brexit is again in the spotlight – is anyone surprised? – as a new survey published this week found that more than three quarters of companies doing business with the EU think the deal is of no help in growing their economic activity. More than half of the British Chambers of Commerce members said they had problems complying with new exporting rules.
77% of firms, for which the Brexit deal is applicable, say it is not helping them increase sales or grow their business. / More than half (56%) of firms face difficulties adapting to the new rules for trading goods. / Almost half (45%) face difficulties adapting to the new rules for trading services, and a similar number (44%) report difficulties obtaining visas for staff.
More than half of UK businesses who trade overseas are finding it difficult to trade goods with the EU post-Brexit, according to a new survey.