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The spectacular collapse of the pound against the US dollar has shattered the illusion that Britain is entitled in perpetuity to special status among the world elite.
Rejecting expertise and skill in favour of loyalty was always going to lead to this.
THE Tories, by the time sterling hit an all-time low of $1.0327 on Monday, had from their political driving seat seen a fall of nearly one-third in the pound’s value against the greenback since June 23, 2016.
Six years into the Brexit disaster, the malevolent anti-democratic forces who did so much to facilitate the success of the vote to leave the EU in June 2016 are finally where they always wanted to be: running the government...
Business secretary Jacob Rees-Mogg’s new Brexit Freedoms Bill claims replacing or repealing all retained EU laws will bring unfettered growth. It’s dangerous and untrue.
Promises that exiting the EU would leave the UK better placed to protect the environment lie in tatters.
The new PM will be discarded by the Tory right as soon as she stops serving her political purpose. / It will be years before we can fully account for the impact Brexit has had on the country, but the grave damage it has done to the Conservative Party is already clear. The only question is whether it’s fatal or not.
A certain group of Brexiteers have got everything they wanted - but they still yearn for the impossible.
An exclusive poll shows that 60% of voters – including 46% of Leave voters – think Boris Johnson has failed on Brexit.
With mounting evidence of Brexit damage in plain sight, Sue Wilson asks whether now is the time to start a campaign to rejoin the EU?
As the cost of Brexit is counted in wrecked livelihoods, ordinary people are starting to call it out. Loudly. Peter Corr is a lorry driver in Derbyshire.
Brexit has reduced UK trade openness, foreign direct investment (FDI) inflows, and immigration growth. New border frictions and higher transport costs pose new barriers to trade, and FDI inflows are unlikely to return to levels reached in the 1990s and 2000s.
A programme of research and commentary on the principles of democracy in the UK constitution, parliament's influence over Brexit, and the implications of these developments for parliamentary reform.
The moving vans have already started arriving at Downing Street, as Britain’s Conservative Party prepares to evict Prime Minister Boris Johnson.
'However, Britain’s current political and economic prospects look grim. To say this is not to be unreasonably pessimistic, but simply to face facts.'
Voters were promised better-funded public services and stronger employment rights after Brexit – Liz Truss and Rishi Sunak are now offering us the opposite, reports Adam Bienkov.
Britons must look at themselves calmly and honestly, recognizing the tough times that lie ahead and the changes needed to get the country back on track. Unfortunately, the country's political leaders remain unwilling to treat voters like grown-ups.
While the government has clarified that the UK will remain a party to the ECHR, as Mark Elliott observes, the Bill aims at ‘substantially decoupling’ the UK from it.
However, simply because we can diverge does not mean that we should diverge; the benefits are negligible at best. The likely result would be the United Kingdom no longer being recognised as a “trusted partner” in the field of data security and the end of a free flow of data.
"It's like a turkey voting for Christmas, isn't it?" / A farmer’s passionate speech about Brexit from 2019 has been making the rounds on social media – with one person saying it “could have been made yesterday”.
Six years after the referendum we can disentangle the evidence and judge the effects on health and care, says Richard Vize.
Brexit after Boris 31/07/2022
Boris Johnson became prime minister on the promise that Brexit would bring prosperity and pride. Did it?
UK and French officials in war of words as holidaymakers hit by long delays.
Liz Truss and Rishi Sunak feel bound to talk lower spending to party members, but the former chancellor at least must see the folly of losing billions off our GDP.
How satisfying for a prime ministerial contender to blame the French for the effects of Brexit.