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Labour shortages have made inflation more persistent, Joost Derks said, putting Britain's economy in a slippery slope.
If inflation stays high, will the PM be honest enough to agree with the Bank of England that leaving the EU is partly to blame?
So how is it going? In economic terms, the past year has helped differentiate the impact of Covid from the impact of Brexit. / Doing so has exposed a hefty price being paid by many firms, as well as public service employment, for dislocation of Britain from its nearest neighbour's trading bloc.
In our series looking at life after Brexit, the European parliament’s former negotiator Guy Verhofstadt argues that Britain exchanged a Jaguar for a Ford Fiesta in the 2016 referendum.
A former Bank of England policymaker suggested there may not be a need for an austerity budget had it not been for Brexit.
Huw Pill said Brexit has reduced trade between the UK and Europe which has had a knock-on effect on labour, productivity and prices.
Brexit is partly to blame for historically high inflation in the UK by causing labour shortages, strengthening pricing pressure among firms, and weakening the economy, Bank of England chief economist Huw Pill has said.
As evidence mounts of the long-term harm being inflicted on the U.K. economy by Brexit, the government is coming under pressure to acknowledge the elephant in the room.
Wages are worth less as direct result of departure from EU, says Monetary Policy Committe member. / Brexit has added 6 per cent to UK food prices, a Bank of England official has said as inflation hit a 41-year high.
Brexit is hurting the UK economy, Bank of England officials said Wednesday, even as government leaders downplay the impact of the seismic EU withdrawal.
Former Monetary Policy Committee at Bank of England Michael Saunders said Brexit is to blame for "persistent" and "lasting" damage to the UK economy.
Former Bank of England governor, Mark Carney said that the fall in the pound and shrinking economy after the UK left the European Union, Brexit, had added to “inflationary pressure”.
Brexit has added to the UK's economic woes by lowering the value of the pound and contributing to price rises, an ex-Bank of England governor has said.
Six years after the UK voted to leave the EU, and two years since we officially left the trading bloc, Brexit has reared its head yet again this week.
Former Bank of England governor Mark Carney has doubled down on his claims Brexit has taken a toll on the pound and sparked higher inflation.
Current financial woes ‘bear out warnings of Remain side in EU referendum’.
Try and find an instance of the market reacting to tax cuts anywhere else on Earth the way it reacted to the UK’s mere mention of such a simple policy. The market usually loves tax cuts. Not this time. Why?
Only the reversal of Brexit can start to fix the state three prime ministers have left the country in.
Experts from the Institute for Fiscal Studies, the Resolution Foundation and others agreed Kwasi Kwarteng’s unfunded tax cuts played a role.
With its economy in tatters, England is not having its finest hour. It is a time of transition for the United Kingdom... /
There is only one real way to properly calm the markets – the Prime Minister and the Chancellor need to reverse the unfunded tax cuts they announced.
In the US they call it ‘starving the beast’ – cut taxes and, as revenue decreases, you create irresistible pressure for austerity.
Rejecting expertise and skill in favour of loyalty was always going to lead to this.
Former Bank of England policymaker Adam Posen insists 80% of high price growth is due to Britain leaving EU.