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The vision of post-Brexit Britain was one of international trade deals that would propel the country into a new era of prosperity. That vision of “Global Britain” is now dead. Thomas Sampson argues that the only viable alternative is a closer trade relationship with the EU.
Decision to leave shrank the British economy by reducing growth and spurring higher inflation, economists say.
Britons are counting the cost of Brexit as the combination of the referendum, pandemic and energy crisis takes its toll.
Businesses that make sporting goods, children’s toys, jewellery and medical goods have struggled the most with the border costs imposed by the UK’s decision to leave the EU.
Poor regulation of harmful chemicals, the City losing control of trillions, the music industry on its knees ... more Brexit consequences.
After holding off some formidable competition, Michelle Mone has claimed the coveted title of The New European’s Liar of the Year for 2023.
Why does the newspaper continue to publish Larry Elliot’s Corbynite nonsense on the EU?
In this week's update from ‘downside bunker’, more evidence emerges that Britain has effectively declared a trade war on itself.
The Independent revealed earlier this year government’s predicted 0.08% boost risked being an overestimate. / Business Secretary Kemi Badenoch was mocked for a prediction the deal with Asia-Pacific countries would grow the economy by 0.08%.
Ever wondered why your taxes are so high and public services are in such a poor state? Now you know.
Read it and weep. With no 'sunlit uplands' in sight, further research into the impact of Brexit confirms some of our worst fears.
Leaving the European Union had an impact on the UK economy equivalent to the coronavirus pandemic and likely reduced output by 4%, the chairman of the Office for Budget Responsibility told the BBC.
Michael Gove just claimed Brexit has “delivered” on Vote Leave’s boldest promise, suggesting it gives £350m a week to the NHS. But has it?
Anthony Robinson presents a panoramic view of the current travails defining a post-Brexit nation.
“Car crash!” exclaimed managing director Andrew Varga, whose Brexit progress I have been following since the referendum. News of the latest Brexit U-turn landed on him on Tuesday out of the blue. All his years of preparation for a new UK product safety mark, all his thousands of pounds wasted, all the uncountable hours and effort were rendered pointless, at a stroke.
Top trade experts say conditions for hidden benefits claimed by Kemi Badenoch are ‘highly unlikely’.
The commercial departments of Brexit-supporting newspapers know the damage being caused to the UK economy, and newspaper advertising revenues, by Brexit. Their editorial colleagues continue to support it anyway.
World-renowned economist Adam Posen reveals some tough truths about Britain’s situation.
The impact on trade overall appears to have been broadly consistent with predictions so far, that on immigration much less negative (and perhaps even positive) and on investment somewhat worse. Perhaps the best estimate of the negative impact on Brexit on UK GDP to date is 2–3% of GDP.
How much has Brexit cost the UK economy? The best publicised estimate is that produced by John Springford of the Centre for European Reform, who concludes that UK GDP is currently about 5% lower than it would have been had we not voted to leave.
Seven years since the referendum, how have the “promises” made by the most prominent Brexiteers panned out? Here’s a rundown of the 10 most spectacular untruths.
The first concerns the United Kingdom. Aside from a few hard-liners, Brexit -- the decision to leave the common market made by Boris Johnson's administration -- has become a disaster.
The ‘remoaner elite’, the civil service, the BBC, universities, unions, refugees: anything is blamed but Brexit itself.
Former Conservative Party chairman says on BBC Question "this is a word one isn’t supposed to use anymore" in attack on UK's problems.
The ruling Conservatives’ efforts to big up their paltry free trade deals with Australia and New Zealand took something of a comic turn this week, with the revelation that the UK Government was shipping signed copies of The Beano to the two countries.