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Contingency plans are being worked out for several sectors of the British industry as the deadline to leave the European Union looms.
Vinyl and CDs are manufactured on mainland Europe leaving the UK supply chain vulnerable to a no-deal Brexit.
Bands, theatre groups and sports clubs could be badly hit by need for visas, carnets and documents.
Brexit is on the horizon – and in the ISM's latest report, research has revealed how it is having a negative effect on the music profession.
THE music scene in Northern Ireland could be 'rocked' on two fronts by Brexit, figures in the industry have claimed.
A no-deal departure from Europe would mean touring musicians could face logistical headaches. / Professional musicians say they are being overlooked in the swirling Brexit debate.
'It seems to us that the same question is facing every industry and every person in the UK: what will you choose to lose?' / Some of the UK’s most respected writers have signed a letter in The Guardian urging voters taking part in the European elections to support the EU.
An opera singer was asked to change her EU flag themed dress for a concert at London's Royal Albert Hall.
US brands Gibson and Fender increase list prices as double digit hikes hit music stores
Rock for Europe is organising music events in Chester, Liverpool and Manchester to support the People’s Vote. This is a unique project – a nationwide event using music to spread the message – that Brexit is not a done deal. We must demand a final say on the Brexit deal, with the option to remain.
Music Against Brexit (MAB) is a movement to inspire people to express their feelings about Brexit through the medium of music.
The UK music industry is uniting to call for an alternative to Brexit. Join us and add your voice. / We, the signatories of this letter, represent artists, producers, managers, businesses, and platforms from across the Music Industry in the UK and are writing to express our real concerns over Brexit and the current direction of the UK’s proposed departure from the EU.
British orchestras tour widely in the EU – and when we leave, they will probably need work permits and special social security and health insurance arrangements, as well as facing delays at the border. / Membership of the single market and the customs union has been hugely beneficial in enabling British orchestras to tour across Europe
A ‘hard’ Brexit could mean the end of European festival goers and bands attending UK events – leaving a £767 million hole that may silence the UK festival scene.
Brexit is a career-killer for freelancers, argues reader Jayne Hamilton. / "I will lose two-thirds of my livelihood at the very least because of Brexit. While companies export products, we freelancers export ourselves. The freedom of movement and work in the single market is vital for us."
For some, freedom of movement might just be jargon. For musician Anneke Scott it is a way of life. But for how much longer? / "All of this freedom, on which my whole life as an artist – and that of many others – rests, is now in jeopardy as a result of Brexit."
One of Britain’s most successful orchestras is moving to Belgium amid fears that its musicians may be among the victims of a post-Brexit crackdown on immigration. The European Union Baroque Orchestra has been based in Oxfordshire since 1985, but will give its last UK concert in its current form at St John’s Smith Square, London, on 19 May, before moving to Antwerp.
‘You can’t ask for EU funding and then not be in the EU,’ says chief executive of orchestra established in London in 1976. The orchestra was established in London in 1976 but the British vote to leave meant it had to come up with a plan for a future outside the UK.
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