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'I think Mr Rowland stands corrected,' said chair after Richard Rowland humiliated in chamber.
The biggest crisis of Brexit to date actually still lies ahead of us in late 2020.
The showdown took place at the European Parliament in Strasbourg today.
'I believe the trade experts', says ex-treasury minister David Gauke - pointing to consensus rejecting claims of rapid new deal.
Boris Johnson's Brexit deal will leave the UK £70bn worse off than if it had remained in the EU, a study by the National Institute of Economic and Social Research (NIESR) has found.
Treasury committee head suggests it means ‘existing analysis stands’ – of a £130bn hit from loss of frictionless trade with EU.
Krugman rejects the assertions of Brexiteers that leaving the single market and customs union will ultimately help the UK export more to the rest of the world.
We are economists who care about Britain and its future. We feel compelled to speak out on the risks of Leaving and opportunities from Remaining in the EU. / 12 Nobel Laureates and over 175 UK based economists have signed this statement.
The report shows that no deal will not “get Brexit done” rather, it will usher in a period of prolonged uncertainty for citizens, workers and businesses, which is unlikely to be resolved anytime soon, our new report, No deal Brexit: issues, impacts, implications, reveals.
The Brexit debate deserves so much better than Economists for Free Trade’s latest offering. Their paper, championed by Jacob Rees-Mogg, tries to make the case for leaving the EU without a deal and trading under World Trade Organization rules.
A few days back, Tim Martin appeared on Question time. A 1-min clip of his performance has gone viral on Twitter. So error-packed was that one minute, that we should take the time to dissect it to bits...
FT economics editor Chris Giles explains the assumptions behind post-Brexit scenarios from the UK government and Bank of England suggesting citizens will be thousands of pounds worse off than if the UK had stayed in the EU.
The damage to the UK economy due to Brexit has cost £66 billion ($86 billion) so far, and left the United Kingdom teetering at the brink of a new recession, according to economic data published last week.
A comprehensive and impartial assessment of the implications of Brexit for economic activity in the UK and the rest of the world.
Dr Thomas Sampson is a Lecturer in the Department of Economics and a Trade Research Programme Associate at the LSE’s Centre for Economic Performance.
Membership of the European Union has contributed to the economic prosperity of the United Kingdom. Uncertainty about the outcome of the referendum has already started to weaken growth in the United Kingdom. A UK exit (Brexit) would be a major negative shock to the UK economy, with economic fallout in the rest of the OECD, particularly other European countries.
Reactions to Theresa May's Lancaster House speech by Simon Wren-Lewis, Jonathan Portes, Ashoka Mody, Adam Posen, Richard Baldwin, Stephanie Flanders, Kallum Pickering, Azad Zangana and Philip Shaw.
The possibility of the UK leaving the European Union (EU) has generated an unusual degree of consensus among economists. Acrimony and rancour surrounded debates around austerity and joining the euro, but analysis from the Bank of England to the OECD to academia has all concluded that Brexit would make us economically worse off.
It is highly uncertain what the UK’s future would look like outside the European Union (EU), which makes ‘Brexit’ a leap into the unknown. This report reviews the advantages and drawbacks of the most likely options.
Their forecast of income gains from Brexit contrasts with all other economic analysis, write Thomas Sampson, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano and John Van Reenen.
This LSE Lecture on the economic impact of Brexit is part of the Programme on Brexit and is given by Lorenzo Codogno, Iain Begg and Francesco Torres, all from the LSE European Institute.