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Border Communities Against Brexit have issued a statement on the progression of the Protocol Bill. The campaigning organisation believe that the new UK Prime Minister will override any amendments made in the House of Lords. They also believe that those promoting this Bill need to be honest about the consequences flowing from it, as thousands of jobs are at risk.
Scotland’s salmon farmers have written to Conservative Party leadership contenders Liz Truss and Rishi Sunak ahead of tomorrow’s Perth hustings to highlight government action needed to support growth of the sector.
The UK government’s latest moves to revise the Northern Ireland Protocol ride roughshod over international law and threaten the country’s reputation and relations abroad.
The UK risks a trade war with the EU if the next Tory leader and prime minister rip up parts of the Brexit deal for Northern Ireland, an MEP has warned.
‘No justification’ for bid to ditch NI protocol, Ireland and Germany warn Johnson.
The UK government’s Northern Ireland Protocol Bill has now begun its journey through Parliament. If passed, it will unilaterally set aside significant sections of the Protocol – breaching international law and risking a trade war in the middle of a cost of living crisis.
Britain is pressing on with a plan to rip up parts of the post-Brexit trade deal it signed with the European Union.
Boris Johnson warned against ‘protectionism’ and violation of WTO rules.
Officials’ comments put paid to idea displeasure with UK is limited to Irish caucus on Capitol Hill.
With a potential trade war looming, Conservatives are stuck in an ever-more destructive disagreement over what Britain should look like outside the EU.
Germany told European Union nations that relations between the UK and the bloc reached a new low and they should be ready for a serious fight if London enacts the bill it proposed to tear up the Northern Ireland Protocol.
Maroš Šefčovič says Brussels will launch fresh legal action against UK over treaty obligations.
Legislation has been published by the British government this evening which overrides the post-Brexit trade arrangements for Ireland and severely breaches both the Brexit Withdrawal Agreement and international law.
Fresh from scandals and an attempted ousting, British Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s latest plan is to tear up key parts of a post-Brexit agreement on Northern Ireland he made himself less than three years ago.
In recent weeks I have been hearing a lot - both publicly and privately - from EU leaders, and from the chief executives of some of the region's biggest companies. No wonder. They've had a lot on their plate with events in Ukraine, a transformation of their energy supply lines, and the prospect of knock-on effects, including possible recession.
The U.K. government has pushed ahead with controversial plans to unilaterally override post-Brexit trade rules, ratcheting up the risk of a trade war as the European Union prepares to take retaliatory legal action.
The European Commission has accused the UK of undermining the trust needed for effective operation of its post-Brexit trade deal.
In a nutshell the Northern Ireland Protocol Bill rips up any judicial or policing role for the EU in respect of trade with its single market - the biggest in the world - via Northern Ireland.
Trade body Salmon Scotland has reiterated its fears that the UK Government’s decision to unilaterally alter part of the post-Brexit deal it agreed with the European Union could hit trade to the Continent, Scottish salmon’s most important export market.
Brussels is set to reveal details of action despite ministers’ insistence the the Northern Ireland protocol plans do not break international law.
Ivan Rogers says plan by ‘dishonest’ government to override Northern Ireland protocol may cause trade war.
The British government appears to have no political will to resolve its festering trade dispute with the European Union and risks endangering the hard-won peace in Northern Ireland, Irish Prime Minister Micheal Martin said Wednesday.
While the picture’s hardly pretty and certainly not what advocates of Brexit envisioned, none of it surprises economists. As a former Bank of England official observed: “You run a trade war against yourself, bad things happen.”
Exporters fear Northern Ireland protocol row will spur trade war with Brussels, making an already difficult job even harder