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Britain should push to rejoin the single market because Brexit is the “biggest piece of self-inflicted harm ever done to a country,” says Sadiq Khan.
Polls show average annual gap between those who believe it was ‘wrong’ to vote to Leave compared to ‘right’ has risen to double digits for the first time. / A growing number of Britons say the UK was wrong to Brexit, according to a Standard analysis of more than 200 polls.
Real pay set to be £470 lower per worker each year, say top economists. / “We can’t blame Brexit for all of the 5.2 per cent GDP shortfall … but it’s apparent that Brexit is largely to blame,” said John Springford, author of the CEF study.
Treasury silent on damage being caused by Brexit to Britain’s economy and Bank of England accused of being reluctant to talk about it.
Figures on the cost of Brexit reported by ITV last week could have given a misleading impression of the cost of leaving the EU.
A study by the Centre for European Reform reveals the “troubling” cost of Brexit and says the losses are now too big to ignore.
UK trade with the EU has fallen sharply, new figures from the Office for Budget Responsibility show.
The Centre for European Reform (CER) estimates that leaving the single market and customs union at the end of 2020 has reduced UK trade by £7.7billion, or 11%, since March.
Brexit has delivered a blow of nearly £16 billion to the UK’s trade in goods since the 2016 referendum, leading experts said today.
Brexit has delivered a £11.5 billion blow to the UK’s trade in goods since the 2016 referendum, a leading think tank said today.
A pro-Brexit minister and MPs have accused the Civil Service of pursuing a ‘Remain’ agenda. Steve Bullock, a former civil servant, argues that the consequences of undermining civil servants in this way are potentially disastrous.
An EU-UK free trade agreement will result in new barriers to trade and border friction even if the UK chooses to unilaterally align itself with EU rules and regulations.
The UK economy is 2.9 per cent smaller than it would be ... model also shows that the biggest victim of the Brexit vote has been business investment, while the weaker pound has failed to foster the big gains in exports that some Brexiters hoped for.
Brexit has already cost the UK economy almost £70bn – the equivalent of £440m a week or £840 for every household in the country each year – according to a new report from the Centre for European Reform released today.
One government department alone spent £5.5m in a single month on management consultants to help with Brexit policy, it has emerged.
Trade in services has not received enough attention in the Brexit debate.
Beth Oppenheim asks John Springford what is in the 585 page withdrawal agreement, and Charles Grant outlines what might happen next: will Theresa May and her withdrawal plan survive?
The UK economy is around 2 per cent smaller as a result of the vote to leave the EU. John Springford speaks to Sophia Besch about his analysis, his modelling method and the implications of the result.
New analysis by the CER – which we will update quarterly – estimates that the UK economy is 2.1 per cent smaller as a result of the vote to leave the EU. The knock-on hit to the public finances is now £23 billion per annum – or £440 million a week.
The UK economy is 2.5 per cent smaller as a result of the vote to leave the EU. John Springford talks to Beth Oppenheim about his latest analysis, how he has refined his modelling method and the implications of the findings.
The think tank study indicates GDP would be 2.3 per cent higher had the UK voted to remain in the EU.
The Centre for European Reform is the UK's foremost think tank on matters European, and Ian Bond is its Director of Foreign Policy, so Chris is in his element this week discussing how Brexit might affect both UK and EU foreign policy. Featuring not one, not two, but three baskets.