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As small businesses crumble, shelves get emptier and the care-worker shortage intensifies, life outside the EU is having a dire effect on many of us. Why aren’t politicians talking about it?
Not before time, Boris Johnson has resigned as leader of the UK’s Conservative Party. The Guardian reports that Johnson’s leadership “toppled under a wave of sleaze allegations and failure to tell the truth.” But his real scandal lies elsewhere — with Brexit.
The British government has chosen unilaterally to break the protocol, which it signed two years ago – but Europe stands by it.
A former Downing Street chief of staff and architect of the Good Friday Agreement has accused the British government of destroying its trust with the Irish government over the Northern Ireland Protocol.
Former prime minister declares that trade deal is off the table until problems are solved.
‘Impossible’ that British alternative NI plan can work, says Italy’s minister for European affairs Vincenzo Amendola.
What should we call a project that poleaxes the economy, destroys our global reputation and threatens political stability in Northern Ireland? If we had known what would come to pass, how would we have voted on it six years ago?
The European Union sued Britain on Wednesday (local time) over its move to rewrite the trade rules agreed to when the country left the EU two years ago, ratcheting up tensions between the major economic partners.
Maroš Šefčovič says Brussels will launch fresh legal action against UK over treaty obligations.
Ministers are portraying themselves as victims of a deal they created for Northern Ireland. A classic blame-shifting strategy.
Brussels has announced it is taking legal action against the UK government after Boris Johnson pushed ahead with plans to overwrite parts of the Brexit agreement.
Boris Johnson’s plans to tear up post-Brexit arrangements for Northern Ireland have come under fierce attack from Washington, with senior congressmen on both sides of the US political divide warning the “irresponsible” move is a threat to peace in the province.
Micheal Martin warned the move to override parts of the international deal could “destabilise” politics in Northern Ireland.
Fresh from scandals and an attempted ousting, British Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s latest plan is to tear up key parts of a post-Brexit agreement on Northern Ireland he made himself less than three years ago.
Bill hands ‘breath-taking’ powers to ministers, warns Hansard Society. / Boris Johnson’s legal justification for tearing up his agreement with the EU on post-Brexit arrangements for Northern Ireland has been branded “hopeless” by the government’s former chief lawyer.
The U.K. government has pushed ahead with controversial plans to unilaterally override post-Brexit trade rules, ratcheting up the risk of a trade war as the European Union prepares to take retaliatory legal action.
Andrew Marr grills Conor Burns MP as he struggles to name an American politician supportive of the government's plan to scrap parts of the NI Protocol without EU support.
Bloc says it will not renegotiate agreement and threatens to take ministers to court for ‘damaging’ unilateral action.
The British government appears to have no political will to resolve its festering trade dispute with the European Union and risks endangering the hard-won peace in Northern Ireland, Irish Prime Minister Micheal Martin said Wednesday.
If other countries don’t trust us to stick to what we agreed, it makes it harder to strike new deals in the future.
Tearing up Northern Ireland protocol ‘will spark trade war, drive up inflation and damage UK influence’, warns senior Tory MP.
Across the UK, the reality of Brexit is increasingly becoming a threat. Food and fuel shortages, and concerns about energy prices, are tangible worries. Here, we use a social identity approach to highlight this Brexit threat is amplified and takes on additional meaning in Northern Ireland because of the identities that are writ large – not least because of the country’s tumultuous past.
The signing of the Belfast Agreement in 1998 brought an end to decades of extreme political violence in Northern Ireland. But more than 20 years later, the peace process still faces threats and both loyalist and republican paramilitary groups continue to operate.
Friday marked 50 years since Ireland signed the treaty in Brussels that took the fledging state into the European Economic Community.