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An expansion of Rosslare Europort to cost €200m, which will Brexit-proof the ferryport facility, has been given the green light.
The inflationary clouds that have been building over the UK manufacturing industry have finally burst, with a dramatic fall in demand creating the sharpest reduction of new orders since May 2020.
Britons must look at themselves calmly and honestly, recognizing the tough times that lie ahead and the changes needed to get the country back on track. Unfortunately, the country's political leaders remain unwilling to treat voters like grown-ups.
Since the UK left the world’s largest free trade market, the EU, the industry has had to face the challenges of long queues at cross channel ports and increased paper work. Not being in the EU also means that Scottish Salmon’s main competitor, Norway, has a huge advantage as it is in the EEA – giving it borderless access to the EU market.
As small businesses crumble, shelves get emptier and the care-worker shortage intensifies, life outside the EU is having a dire effect on many of us. Why aren’t politicians talking about it?
There's one thing that the two candidates locked in a bad-tempered battle to be Britain's next prime minister agree on: Brexit is nothing to do with any of the woes facing the UK right now. / The inconvenient truth, as the head of the port of Dover has confirmed, is that Brexit has indeed contributed to the chaos.
Amid acute political uncertainty and the upheaval of Brexit, the movement of goods on the island of Ireland has been transforming and seeing a significant boost.
A Dorset farm has suspended more than £150,000 of orders and may be forced to abandon any future activity in Europe because of post-Brexit changes at sea ports.
National Assembly member says British excuses for tailbacks were ‘silly’.
Over the last weekend, the Port of Dover has handled almost 142,000 travellers, many of whom have been forced to wait for hours to cross the borders into France.
A French regional leader has blamed Brexit for delays at Dover and Folkestone and suggested the UK should join the Schengen zone.
Following a weekend of utter chaos at the Channel crossing, James O'Brien reminds listeners how the Tories insisted Brexit would not bring about these very issues.
Liz Truss has hit out at the French authorities for the border chaos, but the government rejected an offer to double the number of passport booths in 2020.
The UK asked for an European Union external frontier, similar to the hard borders the EU has with Russia and Turkey, to take effect in Kent.
Mark Simmonds, director of policy at the British Ports Association has said Brexit is responsible for delays at Dover, just hours after Liz Truss blamed the French authorities.
The UK cabinet office has rejected a £33m proposal to double the capacity for French government passport checks at Dover, dooming UK passengers to long delays at the border post-Brexit.
"Since brexit it's been necessary to have every single passport stamped at Dover... and as a result of that everything takes much longer..."
Port of Dover boss Doug Bannister has told LBC that it's "absolutely true" that Brexit is ultimately to blame for the extreme delays at the port of Dover because passports require extra checks.
How satisfying for a prime ministerial contender to blame the French for the effects of Brexit.
Travellers told to allow three to four hours to pass through security and French border checks at port. / French authorities have hit back at claims by the Port of Dover that French border control staff were to blame for a second day of hours-long delays, saying: “France is not responsible for Brexit.”
In historical terms, however, those transgressions will end up being little more than footnotes. Viewed from afar, Johnson’s greatest failing is liable to be what he hoped would be his glorious legacy: Brexit.
Ports are seeking compensation for the facilities, which were meant to carry out the government's new post-Brexit checks but have been put on hold until the end of next year. / Ports across the country are threatening the government with legal action unless compensation is paid to cover the millions of pounds they've spent building new border control posts.
Portsmouth City Council, which operates the Portsmouth International Port, is still footing the bill despite delayed customs checks. / Boris Johnson’s government has left Portsmouth’s local council holding the bag on a nearly £8 million loan it took out to build a giant warehouse to conduct post-Brexit border checks that may now never be used.
Portsmouth International Port said it was required by the Government to create the £25 million site which remains unused.
Duncan Brock, group director at the Chartered Institute of Procurement & Supply, said Brexit remained a 'thorn in the side' of manufacturers, as supply chain managers continued to report that 'ports and paperwork were their undoing' in June. / 'Some firms also noted that ongoing Brexit-related difficulties and weaker growth had impacted new order intakes from the EU,' the report added.