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Money promised to deprived areas after Brexit is instead being used to deal with the aftershocks of leaving the EU, reports Sam Bright.
The spending has been described as "political posturing" and "clearly a waste of public money".
The UK Government's plans for red and green lanes for checks on goods entering Northern Ireland from the rest of the UK will require the construction of "enhanced facilities" at ports, a minister has said.
The number of people arriving at a UK port from France has more than halved after Brexit, a ferry firm has said.
John Cole explores the government's response to a petition calling for an enquiry into the impact of Brexit before it's debated in parliament.
Marine projects in Co Cork will benefit from a rise in funding of €6,032,337, with the single greatest overall investment being €1,779,138 going toward dredging work in Ballycotton Harbour.
The Port of Dunkirk, close to the BeNeLux region, is eyeing even stronger links with Dublin Port and Rosslare Europort while also examining new routes to Ireland's southern ports.
THE PORT OF Dunkirk is looking to mount a significant expansion of trade routes with its Irish counterparts, as the French company sees Ireland as an “underestimated” market even post-Brexit.
Note that the slogans on these placards all represent news that has reached us about the effects of Brexit on Kent specifically. Some of these have featured in articles in Kent Bylines, as linked in the explanations below.
Doug Bannister, CEO of the Port of Dover, has expressed concerns that the time it takes to process a car at Dover will increase from around 90 seconds to 10 minutes when the European Union's incoming Entry/Exit System is brought in.
FINGERPRINT checks set to be introduced on the EU border could cause significant disruption to holidaymakers, industry experts have warned.
Mark Drakeford says during Dublin visit that his country has not found itself to be better off after leaving the EU.
The Port of Dover has called on the government to share the “rules of the game” when it comes to post-Brexit checks.
An expansion of Rosslare Europort to cost €200m, which will Brexit-proof the ferryport facility, has been given the green light.
The inflationary clouds that have been building over the UK manufacturing industry have finally burst, with a dramatic fall in demand creating the sharpest reduction of new orders since May 2020.
Britons must look at themselves calmly and honestly, recognizing the tough times that lie ahead and the changes needed to get the country back on track. Unfortunately, the country's political leaders remain unwilling to treat voters like grown-ups.
Since the UK left the world’s largest free trade market, the EU, the industry has had to face the challenges of long queues at cross channel ports and increased paper work. Not being in the EU also means that Scottish Salmon’s main competitor, Norway, has a huge advantage as it is in the EEA – giving it borderless access to the EU market.
As small businesses crumble, shelves get emptier and the care-worker shortage intensifies, life outside the EU is having a dire effect on many of us. Why aren’t politicians talking about it?
There's one thing that the two candidates locked in a bad-tempered battle to be Britain's next prime minister agree on: Brexit is nothing to do with any of the woes facing the UK right now. / The inconvenient truth, as the head of the port of Dover has confirmed, is that Brexit has indeed contributed to the chaos.
Amid acute political uncertainty and the upheaval of Brexit, the movement of goods on the island of Ireland has been transforming and seeing a significant boost.
A Dorset farm has suspended more than £150,000 of orders and may be forced to abandon any future activity in Europe because of post-Brexit changes at sea ports.
National Assembly member says British excuses for tailbacks were ‘silly’.
Over the last weekend, the Port of Dover has handled almost 142,000 travellers, many of whom have been forced to wait for hours to cross the borders into France.
A French regional leader has blamed Brexit for delays at Dover and Folkestone and suggested the UK should join the Schengen zone.
Following a weekend of utter chaos at the Channel crossing, James O'Brien reminds listeners how the Tories insisted Brexit would not bring about these very issues.